A sample Artist’s Statement

7 09 2012

Today, because we could not discuss the ATC show this summer, we started our first draft of our Artist’s Statements. Just to give you a little food for thought, here’s an artist statement you can read to get the gears rolling.

“My photographic exploration of animal taxidermy has evolved from the examination of individual specimens (as portraits) to the discovery or placement of animals in unusual contexts. Although taxidermy is still in the forefront, the relationship between the animal and its environment plays a greater role, thus adding a level of mysterious narrative to each situation. The photogravure process transforms this photographic information to image-as-object and creates a dissonance far more pronounced than the artificiality of the taxidermy alone.

“Silent warbler” is from Locomotive Torpor, a suite which documents small, dried animal remains and presents them as fossil-like impressions using ink on paper. The attraction to these small creatures is greatly magnified by their individual animation. They seem active, gesturing, locomotive. The gestures or implied movement of each specimen contradicts their mummified state. The greatly enlarged scale allows the viewer to explore the minutiae of the usually unexamined detail. Each creature is presented on a sheet of heavy paper, hung from specimen pins through metal grommets. The images are imprinted into the fibers of the paper in ink by a photogravure plate to echo the fossil-like nature of the specimen.

The rich beauty of the historical photogravure process represents most of my other work and is a jumping off point for my book works, artistamps and many mixed media potentialities.”

-David Morrish from Art of the Photogravure

David Morrish was my Photography instructor at Sir Wilfred Grenfell College’s School of Fine Arts. I threw this in just to provide some more artist exposure.

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Hyper Really Awesome.

26 01 2010

I am thrilled to direct your attention to the previous post about Singapore photographer Jing. It seems that by whatever means our humble little site came to his attention, and he responded to the creative question I put to you that week. Scroll back to the comments from that week to see the Artist’s own explanation.

Personally, I couldn’t think of a more awesome validation of the discussions we have on creativity on this blog. It’s just brilliant.





That’s some Zesty Photography

15 01 2010

http://superhyperreal.com/test/

Welcome to Jingapore, the artistic creation of Singapore photographer, Jing. Jing creates these intense and energetic images creating a world far more dynamic than it is mundane, it’s really cool stuff. This “Super Hyper Real” world of his creates a great artistic image, and the work is really engaging. His website contains the statement;

“Take the mundane, the everyday, the uninspiring

fill it with life, energy and colour,

all tropical shiny-eyed optimism,

like an everyday Broadway musical.

This is my SUPERHYPERREAL world,

This is JINGAPORE.”

So I know what he is doing, what I’d like you guys to do this week is tell me “why” you think he does this. What message is he delivering? Take that “Artist’s statement” further.





Some art, then a message.

11 01 2010

“My photographic exploration of animal taxidermy has evolved from the examination of individual specimens (as portraits) to the discovery or placement of animals in unusual contexts. Although taxidermy is still in the forefront, the relationship between the animal and its environment plays a greater role, thus adding a level of mysterious narrative to each situation. The photogravure process transforms this photographic information to image-as-object and creates a dissonance far more pronounced than the artificiality of the taxidermy alone.

“Silent warbler” is from Locomotive Torpor, a suite which documents small, dried animal remains and presents them as fossil-like impressions using ink on paper. The attraction to these small creatures is greatly magnified by their individual animation. They seem active, gesturing, locomotive. The gestures or implied movement of each specimen contradicts their mummified state. The greatly enlarged scale allows the viewer to explore the minutiae of the usually unexamined detail. Each creature is presented on a sheet of heavy paper, hung from specimen pins through metal grommets. The images are imprinted into the fibers of the paper in ink by a photogravure plate to echo the fossil-like nature of the specimen.

The rich beauty of the historical photogravure process represents most of my other work and is a jumping off point for my book works, artistamps and many mixed media potentialities.”

-David Morrish from Art of the Photogravure

David Morrish was my Photography instructor at Sir Wilfred Grenfell College’s School of Fine Arts. I threw this in just to provide some more artist exposure.

I just wanted to post as well to point out that if you weren’t in class today you missed me announce the following;

1. Typically each of you have presented 6 art issues in the year to date. 7 will be the final number, feel free to prepare an extra to present next monday if you need to catch up.

2. The online issues have also been opened up to revisit. Any entry you missed in the year to date you may go back to and respond to.

These are limited time offers, basically leading up to the day of your evaluation interview, at that time I will not be looking at revisited work.